The Bauhaus was founded in 1919 in the city of Weimar by German architect Walter Gropius (1883–1969). Its core objective was a radical concept: to reimagine the material world to reflect the unity of all the arts. Bauhaus (1919), which described a utopian craft guild combining architecture, sculpture, and painting into a single creative expression.
In 1925, the Bauhaus moved from Weimar to Dessau, where Gropius designed a new building to house the school. This building contained many features that later became hallmarks of modernist architecture, including steel-frame construction, a glass curtain wall, and an asymmetrical, pinwheel plan, throughout which Gropius distributed studio, classroom, and administrative space for maximum efficiency and spatial logic.

Marcel #Breuer sitting on Model B3 #Wassily #Chair, 1925-26

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Josef Albers – Perpetual Homage to the Square Josef #Albers is another hot name on the list, and this is partially because of his immigration to the United States after the Bauhaus had closed. While he was working at the Bauhaus, he spent several years #collaborating with Paul Klee. The two had held one of the most interesting workshops, dedicated to glass and furniture design. The collaborative research had brought greater knowledge and experience to both of them, as well as their students, which was exactly the essential significance of the Bauhaus. In his mature years, Albers had a chance to work with some of the most prominent post-war artists, becoming the head of a new art school called the Black Mountain College in North Carolina. Albers became the master of many genres, but he is best known for his abstract Homage to the Square series. It is reasonable to presume that this series, inaugurated in 1949, was rooted in his former Bauhaus experience.

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Oskar Schlemmer – Revisiting Ballet Oskar #Schlemmer had a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach to art, being a #sculptor, a painter and a designer as well. However, the genres that he is most remembered for are #theater and #ballet, which were brought to greater heights during his engagement at the school. He was both a #choreographer and a #costume #designer, which helped both of these areas advance and expand their fields of research, loosen their boundaries and erase edges between arts as independent disciplines. Schlemmer’s most famous work is Triadisches Ballett, in which costumes gradually transform actors into geometrical shapes on stage. This work had announced a change in performing arts, which we were able to witness later on, and we see it today as well.

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“A house is a machine for living in” – Le #Corbusier

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Josef Albers teaches at Black Mountain College. #Bauhaus #pioneer and post painterly abstractist Josef #Albers is widely renowned for his experiments with and theories of colour, but what is less know is his ongoing exploration into black. A new #exhibition at Waddington Custot Galleries is the first to shed light on this section of Albers' output, considering how – through a number of #paintings, #works on #paper, #glass works, #photographs and engravings on vinylite – his monochrome experimentations in various media helped to inform his knowledge and understanding of colour. Here, in celebration of the show's opening, we present our favourite facts about the German-born American artist alongside a brilliant selection of works from the display.

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Wassily #Kandinsky and his #cat, Vaske

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